• hffishwick

Must Do Better



It's a new term and Kat is ready to make the Feminist Society an epic success. But with an oblivious head teacher, toxic Instagram accounts and a secretive new girl, nothing will be as straightforward as she hopes. Is Kat helping or hindering progress with her society? And how can she support her friends when her own life so often feels like it's falling apart?


This novel is so funny! There are so many laugh out loud moments it would be impossible to list them all, or even pick a favourite.


And when I wasn't shaking with laughter, I was shaking with rage. Must Do Better covers so many important topics as it explores the culture of toxic masculinity in school and the double standards boys and girls are often held to in their behaviour. Kat shows that individuals can make a difference and that it's worth standing up for what you believe in and speaking out when you see something wrong. It's also clear throughout that equality, and feminism, are for everyone.


One of the reasons this novel is so good is that Kat is really relatable. She has such a clear idea of how she wants her day to go, but everything always ends up in comic disaster. I think the way she questions and doubts herself will resonate with lots of readers.


There's also a host of well rounded side characters in Kat's brilliant friendship group. Sam and Millie both go through their own problems, from family breakdowns to boyfriend betrayals, and Kat's desire to support them, even with her own issues to worry about, shows the strength and importance of teen friendships. I think most teen readers will relate to someone in this book - even the antagonists have complex motivations and have been well developed.


I know I said I could pick a favourite comedy moment, but the scenes in Nick's car definitely gave me flashbacks to being a teenager (and made me really pleased cars will probably all be autonomous by the time my kids are old enough to drive!)


Must Do Better also offers an honest insight into anxiety, depression and OCD. Kat's therapy sessions show there are no 'easy fixes' but talking and seeking help do make a huge impact.


Thank you BKMRK for letting me review an advanced copy on NetGalley